Obama Administration announces a plan to create a national STEM Master Teacher Corps

STEM Master Teacher Corps

Today, the Obama Administration announced a plan to create a national STEM Master Teacher Corps, which will recognize and reward 10,000 exceptional science, math, technology and engineering teachers in our nation’s classrooms. Educators who join the STEM Master Teachers Corps will make a commitment to champion the cause of STEM education in their respective communities, and will receive additional resources to mentor math and science teachers, inspire students, and help their communities grow

A world-class STEM workforce is essential to virtually every goal we have as a nation – whether it’s broadly shared economic prosperity, international competitiveness, a strong national defense, a clean energy future, and longer, healthier, lives for all Americans.  By creating a STEM Master Teaching Corps to inspire students, and by giving these educators the necessary resources to teach well, we are investing in America’s future.

To learn more about the administration’s efforts to promote excellence in STEM education visit http://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/eop/ostp

View this article in its original form on the White House Web site at:  http://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2012/07/18/numbers-10000?utm_source=wh.gov&utm_medium=shorturl&utm_campaign=shorturl

Maker Camp on Google

Over the course of six weeks, 13- to 18-year-olds (as well as their parents and teachers) will have the opportunity to collaborate with popular maker personalities—including Mark Frauenfelder of Boing Boing, Stephen Voltz  and Fritz Grobe  of EepyBird (the Coke and Mentos guys),  Jimmy DiResta  (co-host of Dirty Money on the Discovery Channel) and Limor Fried  (founder of Adafruit Industries) — and other creative makers on fun projects themed around “the art of making.” Our goal is to encourage everyone this summer to make something and share it with their friends and family.

Maker Camp on Google
Maker Camp on Google

Making is a wonderful way to experiment and explore, to try to do new things, and mostly to let your imagination get the best of you. Making is fun (and it’s also a great way to learn, even if it is summer!). Making can be done indoors — even in a small space, like a kitchen table — but it’s also great to go outdoors to make things you can play with in the backyard or park.

Making could mean traditional arts and crafts projects, or science projects, but it could also use innovative technologies and processes that enable you to create something entirely new.

Every Monday through Thursday morning, beginning Monday, July 16, a Maker Camp “counselor” will post how-to instructions for a new project, right here on MAKE’s Google+ page. Some of these projects will overlap with ones in MAKE’s 3D “School’s Out” special issue, our first-ever summer issue devoted entirely to kids.

These projects are great for families to do together or for teens to do on their own. Many of the projects involve materials and tools that you can find around the house. Camp Director Nick Raymond will host a Hangout On Air in the afternoon so campers can post questions and comments and share photos and videos of their projects.

The first project at Maker Camp is our popular compressed air rocket. You’ll see from his post below that rocket guru Rick Schertle  is our guest counselor for this project, and will be with us in New York to launch Maker Camp (and rockets!) with a Hangout today at the New York Hall of Science.

It wouldn’t be summer camp unless you were able to meet a lot of great, new friends who share your love of making. You’ll find that other campers will inspire you to come up with new ideas for projects.

Maker Camp is free, and open to everyone with a Google+ profile (you must be over 13 to have your own Google+ profile). To participate, simply follow +MAKE

Whether you build rockets or race cars, make T-shirts or experimental music, or discover nature or new things in the community where you live, I hope that you’ll have a blast at Maker Camp.

Use this link to see more!

https://plus.google.com/u/0/109780686446922422512/posts#109780686446922422512/posts

MakerBot Replicator at Westport Library’s New “Maker Space”

The Westport Library unveiled their new Maker Space at a press conference this morning.  In the Maker Space is a new 3D printer, a MakerBot Replicator:

Dennis Wong with the MakerBot Replicator donated to the Westport Public Library by CLASP Homes and the Westport Sunrise Rotary Club
Dennis Wong of the Westport Sunrise Rotary Club and member of the Westport Mini Maker Faire Organizing Committee with the MakerBot Replicator donated to the Westport Public Library by CLASP Homes and the Westport Sunrise Rotary Club

The Westport Library is the first library in Connecticut to have a 3D printer.  The printer was donated to the Library as a result of the Westport Mini Maker Faire, CLASP Homes and the Westport Sunrise Rotary Club.

The 3D printer will be used for programs involving community members from Westport and surrounding communities.

Westport Mini Maker Faire at the Great Duck Race 2012

The weather was warm and the crowds were out to see the ducks race for the Westport Sunrise Rotary Club’s annual Great Duck Race on Saturday.

We were pleased to see how many people stopped by the Westport Mini Maker Booth where Michael Staw demonstrated his homebuilt CNC router alongside John D’Ausilio’s MakerBot Replicator:

Kerstin Warner, Michael Staw, Mark Mathias and John D'Ausilio at the Great Duck Race 2012
Kerstin Warner, Michael Staw, Mark Mathias and John D'Ausilio at the Westport Sunrise Rotary Club's Great Duck Race 2012

Both Michael and John created duck-themed items:  duck carving with the CNC router and orange ducks were created with the MakerBot.  The crowds continued all day.

Kerstin Warner’s energy helped passers-by learn about marshmallow shooters, makers, LEDs and generally kept the energy high.